animation – ¡Vámonos!
 

Category: animation

Having posted my presentation on the QCA unit El Carnaval de los animales earlier today, it seemed rather appropriate that I should find a free resource that goes with the unit this evening!

I knew that the Consejería de Educacción had a wonderful poster to illustrate this unit, but until now didn’t know that they had a downloadable animation that features the same wonderful illustrations. With files that are compatible with Mac or PC, the animation presents the vocabulary if you press the musical notes, then asks you to drag the correct word to the correct picture. If you make a mistake, there’s a lovely chorus of children saying ‘no’. Only does one thing but fun nonetheless.

There’s also an animation for Christmas featuring a Christmas decorated with baubles from the Spanish speaking world and the villancico Campana sobre Campana which is lovely, and an animated alphabet which is only downloadable on a PC :O(

Lots of other great stuff on the site for the primary classroom too. More at a future date!

After a tweet from @NeilAdam this morning inviting me to view a clip suggesting that cupcakes are the meaning of life, I discovered Fuzzwich.

Fuzzwich is an online tool for making short animations using backgrounds and characters supplied, plus speech bubbles.  The length of the animation seems to be limited to about 20 seconds and I have to admit to not having discovered all the features yet, but here’s my first attempt. (If it won’t work below, here’s the direct link!)

It’s rather fun!

Lisibo’s been shopping again.  This time, though, it’s not IKEA that has inspired her but TK Maxx that has come up trumps.

In the sale (!) I found this Very Hungry Caterpillar felt set.

Ideal for –

  • telling the story to the class
  • getting pupils to follow the story actively by adding / moving/ substituting the felt pieces
  • animating – and because it’s a felt board, you can do it horizontally or vertically
  • small group work
  • independent play

Sad that Year 3 have finished with that story for the year and we’ll have to wait until next September to ry it out with them.  perhaps it’s time I invaded Foundation stage again…

The Hungry Caterpillar is a great story to use with kids as it’s familiar and repetitive.  The vocabulary is simple and everyday – numbers, colours, food – and it looks at healthy eating as well as the life cycle of the caterpillar / butterfly, so very cross curricular!

There are great resources all over the place for this story including

And that’s just gleaned from a quick Google search!

Plumíferos (pt2)

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According to wikipedia, Plumíferos “is a 2010 Argentine computer-animated film made by Manos Digitales Animation Studio using Open Source software for all 3D models, animation, lighting and render process, under Linux operating system.”

It’s taken years to get to the screens with parts shown as early as 2005.

Some further bits to share-

great song!

And very interesting to see the voice actors in this film.

Doesn’t seem to be available on Amazon or iTunes yet though…. 🙁

Plumíferos

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Thanks to @stevebunce for his Tweet that alerted me to this.

Looks a great film. My boys are definitely interested.

I like this version of the trailer as it has the Spanish sound but also English subtitles.

But it also exists without the subtitles.

And I quite like the English version which is completely different.

And the best bit…..

Yesterday, as the European eTwinning Ambassadors PDW at National college of School Leadership in Nottingham drew to a close, I took part in what Drew Buddie aka @digitalmaverick entitled ‘a Teachmeet style-y thingy’.

Drew introduced the idea of an ‘unconference’ explaining both TedX and Teachmeet before opening the floor to others to share their 7 minute micro or 2 minute nano presentations.

I was first up – see the next post for my presentation – and later for a video of it (if it’s not too hideous!)

Other presenters were-

Lieven from Flanders who shared his magnificent projects, all documented on his blog. These included repurposing old computer mice, decorating them and then using TuxPaint to animate them (MouseArt), using Pivot to make animations of bubbles (B@llobees) and also to make animated characters @ni & M@te who travelled to other schools and found out about them.

Two things that particularly struck me were firstly when Lieven said he liked ‘making the unexpected valuable’ which struck a chord, and also the use of technology to back up and enhance more traditional methods eg the Kindergarten pupils made bubble pictures with paint and straws, and those pieces of art were used as the background for the Bubble animations.

Next up was Paddy who talked about his eTwinning project Wii will rock you which used the Nintendo Wii as a stimulus.  I enjoyed this presentation as Paddy underlined that it was not all about playing games, but that the games were the starting point for other activities – writing letters, designing CD covers, planning tours with travel plans and money considerations, cooperation with other children, publicity and negotiation.  They also worked on a joint sports day with a school in ireland with some ‘traditional’ sports day activities as well as Wii based ones.

Then Susi Arnott shared about using comic strips and Comic Life, and how the process of looking at comics enhanced the understanding of texts and enhanced literacy skills.  She mentioned Bitstrips which I will be investigating!

Drew used Twitter to ask why people went to Teachmeets- responses included:

‘the range of ideas’

‘a cross subject sharing of ideas’

‘non threatening’ collaborative spirit’

‘celebrating work done in my classroom’

‘meeting like minded colleagues leads to great PLNs’

‘at least 20 ideas for use tomorrow’

‘widens my ideas’

Nick Falk finished up the meet with a nano-presentation on the use of QR codes and QR readers in mobile phones.  Very interesting, and something I need to investigate!

No camel, no fruit machine and no alcohol; but otherwise pretty like a normal TeachMeet! Oh, and no cupcakes.  Sorry @niiloa

Another example of the wonder of animation from Oscar Stringer.

This clearly shows how animation can be used in the primary classroom to present and rehearse vocabulary as well as make ‘pop videos’
Find out more on Oscar’s blog.
And if you’re going to the Primary Languages Show in Liverpool next Friday, you can catch Oscar sharing more ideas and examples of animating in the PLL classroom.

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYHJ4Q4C]

Animated languages

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Another highlight of the Hampshire Language Conference was Oscar Stringer‘s session on Animation. So popular it was put on twice, and had to move rooms to accommodate the number of people wishing to attend, from the conversations I heard, Oscar and his ideas were a hit!

Using I Can Animate and a Hue webcam, Oscar guided the assembled throng through how to animate using fuzzy felts before adding voiceover using iMovie – bet he had no shortage of volunteers!

You can see the finished movies – made in 20 minutes!- on Oscar’s blog, along with other examples of animation using languages such as the ones from Wednesday in Gloucestershire, and the lovely animations made with a Reception class last year. You’ll also find plenty of tips and guidance on how animation can be used right across the curriculum and beyond.

Animation is such a brilliant way of getting kids to be creative, to collaborate and to be independent – and it’s such fun!

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